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Las Vegas W Hotel Opens in SLS Hotel’s Former Lux Tower

Las Vegas W Hotel Opens in SLS Hotel’s Former Lux Tower

Formerly the Lux Tower of the SLS Hotel, the W Hotel opened its first Las Vegas Strip property in late 2016. The new Vegas location is the 50th W property.

The intimate hotel within a hotel has 289 rooms and added its own W-branded lobby, spa, bar, and pool area.

The new rooms were designed by Philippe Starck and Gensler & Associates and house Bliss bath produces, signature W bedding, black and white wall murals, a long narrow white leather banquette, dual sinks, and a huge shower. For big spenders, the enormous 2,382 square foot Extreme WOW suite, designed by Lenny Kravitz, is located on top of the tower with mountain views.

In addition to the rooftop WET Deck with pool, cabanas, and a bar, the Away Spa, and 24-hour Fit gym, W guests can enjoy all of the amenities at the SLS Hotel.

This includes SLS’s flagship restaurant, Bazaar Meat by José Andrés. Much more than your average steakhouse, it is the biggest Andrés restaurant in the world at more than 13,000 square feet. The huge main dining room resembles an upscale Spanish-inspired hunting lodge for 335 guests with tan leather booths and chairs, long wooden communal tables, and mounted plaster animal heads of bulls and crocodiles.

The menu is on the same large scale as the restaurant. Diners can choose from carpaccio, tartars, a few small sandwiches and cured meats, a raw bar, foie gras cotton candy, and all kinds of steak and beef options while watching all chefs in action in the open kitchens.

This is Vegas, so of course there are additional dining options. 800 Degrees Neapolitan Pizzeria sources fresh ingredients to make its 60-second pizzas. In line with the make-your-own fast-casual trend, guests choose from an original thin soft crust, a crispy crust, or a gluten-free option then a variety of bases including Margherita (fresh tomatoes and cheese); bianca with mozzarella, Parmigiano Reggiano, and garlic; marinara with tomato, garlic, and oregano; or verde with a pinenut basil pesto sauce. Add on proteins, cheeses, and vegetables, or pair with a variety of salads and small bites including meatballs, truffle cheese bread, and prosciutto with mozzarella.

W guests can also dine at Katsuya offering Japanese cuisine, unique rolls and sushi, and sashimi; Cleo offering Mediterranean dishes and unique wines; Umami Burger and Northside Café & Chinese Kitchen offering 24-hour comfort food and Chinese cuisine.


Sahara hotel returns to Las Vegas in splashy renaming ceremony. Bye bye, SLS

Like a Las Vegas magic trick, the legendary Sahara hotel-casino reappeared on the Strip during a splashy renaming of the SLS resort Thursday evening. The Moroccan-themed hotel that opened in 1952 and helped shape Vegas’ midcentury glamour, hosting A-listers such as Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, was back.

Owner Alex Meruelo, who bought the resort last April, revealed the new name — written in all capital letters — amid fireworks and a light-flashing drone show that projected jackpot-winning slot reels (triple cherries and triple sevens) in the sky above.

The finale spelled out “Sahara” in lights.

The name change comes amid an ongoing renovation of the property with a price tag of more than $100 million. The property’s 1,615 guest rooms, casino, restaurants and bars have been upgraded. Improvements to the lobby and other areas will continue into 2020, a news release said.

The Sahara closed in 2011, became an SLS hotel (short for “style, luxury and service”) in 2014, hosted a W Las Vegas in one of its towers for two years, and now has come full circle with the new-old Sahara name.

In a statement before the event, Meruelo said the hotel played “an important role in the evolution of the destination,” and pledged to continue that tradition “for the love of Vegas.”

Rooms this weekend start at $206 a night, according to the website.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

More From the Los Angeles Times

At parks and other attractions, thousands of jobs are unfilled

Housesitting comes with responsibilities, but it can help stretch your vacation budget. Here’s how to find gigs.

A stretch of Salvadoran shoreline called Surf City is the location for the final qualifying rounds for surfing’s debut as an Olympic sport this summer.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

These trips will take you to priceless places, and our pro tips will help you dig deeper.

The state’s economy will reopen, but ‘the disease has not been extinguished,’ governor says.

In recent years, the boardwalk has become an open-air clinic for poor residents, people struggling with addiction and those in physical or mental distress.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

Mike Broomhead, a talk radio host in Phoenix, used to support a local audit of the 2020 election. Now he’s urging fellow Republicans to reconsider.


Sahara hotel returns to Las Vegas in splashy renaming ceremony. Bye bye, SLS

Like a Las Vegas magic trick, the legendary Sahara hotel-casino reappeared on the Strip during a splashy renaming of the SLS resort Thursday evening. The Moroccan-themed hotel that opened in 1952 and helped shape Vegas’ midcentury glamour, hosting A-listers such as Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, was back.

Owner Alex Meruelo, who bought the resort last April, revealed the new name — written in all capital letters — amid fireworks and a light-flashing drone show that projected jackpot-winning slot reels (triple cherries and triple sevens) in the sky above.

The finale spelled out “Sahara” in lights.

The name change comes amid an ongoing renovation of the property with a price tag of more than $100 million. The property’s 1,615 guest rooms, casino, restaurants and bars have been upgraded. Improvements to the lobby and other areas will continue into 2020, a news release said.

The Sahara closed in 2011, became an SLS hotel (short for “style, luxury and service”) in 2014, hosted a W Las Vegas in one of its towers for two years, and now has come full circle with the new-old Sahara name.

In a statement before the event, Meruelo said the hotel played “an important role in the evolution of the destination,” and pledged to continue that tradition “for the love of Vegas.”

Rooms this weekend start at $206 a night, according to the website.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

More From the Los Angeles Times

At parks and other attractions, thousands of jobs are unfilled

Housesitting comes with responsibilities, but it can help stretch your vacation budget. Here’s how to find gigs.

A stretch of Salvadoran shoreline called Surf City is the location for the final qualifying rounds for surfing’s debut as an Olympic sport this summer.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

These trips will take you to priceless places, and our pro tips will help you dig deeper.

The state’s economy will reopen, but ‘the disease has not been extinguished,’ governor says.

In recent years, the boardwalk has become an open-air clinic for poor residents, people struggling with addiction and those in physical or mental distress.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

Mike Broomhead, a talk radio host in Phoenix, used to support a local audit of the 2020 election. Now he’s urging fellow Republicans to reconsider.


Sahara hotel returns to Las Vegas in splashy renaming ceremony. Bye bye, SLS

Like a Las Vegas magic trick, the legendary Sahara hotel-casino reappeared on the Strip during a splashy renaming of the SLS resort Thursday evening. The Moroccan-themed hotel that opened in 1952 and helped shape Vegas’ midcentury glamour, hosting A-listers such as Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, was back.

Owner Alex Meruelo, who bought the resort last April, revealed the new name — written in all capital letters — amid fireworks and a light-flashing drone show that projected jackpot-winning slot reels (triple cherries and triple sevens) in the sky above.

The finale spelled out “Sahara” in lights.

The name change comes amid an ongoing renovation of the property with a price tag of more than $100 million. The property’s 1,615 guest rooms, casino, restaurants and bars have been upgraded. Improvements to the lobby and other areas will continue into 2020, a news release said.

The Sahara closed in 2011, became an SLS hotel (short for “style, luxury and service”) in 2014, hosted a W Las Vegas in one of its towers for two years, and now has come full circle with the new-old Sahara name.

In a statement before the event, Meruelo said the hotel played “an important role in the evolution of the destination,” and pledged to continue that tradition “for the love of Vegas.”

Rooms this weekend start at $206 a night, according to the website.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

More From the Los Angeles Times

At parks and other attractions, thousands of jobs are unfilled

Housesitting comes with responsibilities, but it can help stretch your vacation budget. Here’s how to find gigs.

A stretch of Salvadoran shoreline called Surf City is the location for the final qualifying rounds for surfing’s debut as an Olympic sport this summer.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

These trips will take you to priceless places, and our pro tips will help you dig deeper.

The state’s economy will reopen, but ‘the disease has not been extinguished,’ governor says.

In recent years, the boardwalk has become an open-air clinic for poor residents, people struggling with addiction and those in physical or mental distress.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

Mike Broomhead, a talk radio host in Phoenix, used to support a local audit of the 2020 election. Now he’s urging fellow Republicans to reconsider.


Sahara hotel returns to Las Vegas in splashy renaming ceremony. Bye bye, SLS

Like a Las Vegas magic trick, the legendary Sahara hotel-casino reappeared on the Strip during a splashy renaming of the SLS resort Thursday evening. The Moroccan-themed hotel that opened in 1952 and helped shape Vegas’ midcentury glamour, hosting A-listers such as Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, was back.

Owner Alex Meruelo, who bought the resort last April, revealed the new name — written in all capital letters — amid fireworks and a light-flashing drone show that projected jackpot-winning slot reels (triple cherries and triple sevens) in the sky above.

The finale spelled out “Sahara” in lights.

The name change comes amid an ongoing renovation of the property with a price tag of more than $100 million. The property’s 1,615 guest rooms, casino, restaurants and bars have been upgraded. Improvements to the lobby and other areas will continue into 2020, a news release said.

The Sahara closed in 2011, became an SLS hotel (short for “style, luxury and service”) in 2014, hosted a W Las Vegas in one of its towers for two years, and now has come full circle with the new-old Sahara name.

In a statement before the event, Meruelo said the hotel played “an important role in the evolution of the destination,” and pledged to continue that tradition “for the love of Vegas.”

Rooms this weekend start at $206 a night, according to the website.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

More From the Los Angeles Times

At parks and other attractions, thousands of jobs are unfilled

Housesitting comes with responsibilities, but it can help stretch your vacation budget. Here’s how to find gigs.

A stretch of Salvadoran shoreline called Surf City is the location for the final qualifying rounds for surfing’s debut as an Olympic sport this summer.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

These trips will take you to priceless places, and our pro tips will help you dig deeper.

The state’s economy will reopen, but ‘the disease has not been extinguished,’ governor says.

In recent years, the boardwalk has become an open-air clinic for poor residents, people struggling with addiction and those in physical or mental distress.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

Mike Broomhead, a talk radio host in Phoenix, used to support a local audit of the 2020 election. Now he’s urging fellow Republicans to reconsider.


Sahara hotel returns to Las Vegas in splashy renaming ceremony. Bye bye, SLS

Like a Las Vegas magic trick, the legendary Sahara hotel-casino reappeared on the Strip during a splashy renaming of the SLS resort Thursday evening. The Moroccan-themed hotel that opened in 1952 and helped shape Vegas’ midcentury glamour, hosting A-listers such as Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, was back.

Owner Alex Meruelo, who bought the resort last April, revealed the new name — written in all capital letters — amid fireworks and a light-flashing drone show that projected jackpot-winning slot reels (triple cherries and triple sevens) in the sky above.

The finale spelled out “Sahara” in lights.

The name change comes amid an ongoing renovation of the property with a price tag of more than $100 million. The property’s 1,615 guest rooms, casino, restaurants and bars have been upgraded. Improvements to the lobby and other areas will continue into 2020, a news release said.

The Sahara closed in 2011, became an SLS hotel (short for “style, luxury and service”) in 2014, hosted a W Las Vegas in one of its towers for two years, and now has come full circle with the new-old Sahara name.

In a statement before the event, Meruelo said the hotel played “an important role in the evolution of the destination,” and pledged to continue that tradition “for the love of Vegas.”

Rooms this weekend start at $206 a night, according to the website.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

More From the Los Angeles Times

At parks and other attractions, thousands of jobs are unfilled

Housesitting comes with responsibilities, but it can help stretch your vacation budget. Here’s how to find gigs.

A stretch of Salvadoran shoreline called Surf City is the location for the final qualifying rounds for surfing’s debut as an Olympic sport this summer.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

These trips will take you to priceless places, and our pro tips will help you dig deeper.

The state’s economy will reopen, but ‘the disease has not been extinguished,’ governor says.

In recent years, the boardwalk has become an open-air clinic for poor residents, people struggling with addiction and those in physical or mental distress.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

Mike Broomhead, a talk radio host in Phoenix, used to support a local audit of the 2020 election. Now he’s urging fellow Republicans to reconsider.


Sahara hotel returns to Las Vegas in splashy renaming ceremony. Bye bye, SLS

Like a Las Vegas magic trick, the legendary Sahara hotel-casino reappeared on the Strip during a splashy renaming of the SLS resort Thursday evening. The Moroccan-themed hotel that opened in 1952 and helped shape Vegas’ midcentury glamour, hosting A-listers such as Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, was back.

Owner Alex Meruelo, who bought the resort last April, revealed the new name — written in all capital letters — amid fireworks and a light-flashing drone show that projected jackpot-winning slot reels (triple cherries and triple sevens) in the sky above.

The finale spelled out “Sahara” in lights.

The name change comes amid an ongoing renovation of the property with a price tag of more than $100 million. The property’s 1,615 guest rooms, casino, restaurants and bars have been upgraded. Improvements to the lobby and other areas will continue into 2020, a news release said.

The Sahara closed in 2011, became an SLS hotel (short for “style, luxury and service”) in 2014, hosted a W Las Vegas in one of its towers for two years, and now has come full circle with the new-old Sahara name.

In a statement before the event, Meruelo said the hotel played “an important role in the evolution of the destination,” and pledged to continue that tradition “for the love of Vegas.”

Rooms this weekend start at $206 a night, according to the website.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

More From the Los Angeles Times

At parks and other attractions, thousands of jobs are unfilled

Housesitting comes with responsibilities, but it can help stretch your vacation budget. Here’s how to find gigs.

A stretch of Salvadoran shoreline called Surf City is the location for the final qualifying rounds for surfing’s debut as an Olympic sport this summer.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

These trips will take you to priceless places, and our pro tips will help you dig deeper.

The state’s economy will reopen, but ‘the disease has not been extinguished,’ governor says.

In recent years, the boardwalk has become an open-air clinic for poor residents, people struggling with addiction and those in physical or mental distress.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

Mike Broomhead, a talk radio host in Phoenix, used to support a local audit of the 2020 election. Now he’s urging fellow Republicans to reconsider.


Sahara hotel returns to Las Vegas in splashy renaming ceremony. Bye bye, SLS

Like a Las Vegas magic trick, the legendary Sahara hotel-casino reappeared on the Strip during a splashy renaming of the SLS resort Thursday evening. The Moroccan-themed hotel that opened in 1952 and helped shape Vegas’ midcentury glamour, hosting A-listers such as Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, was back.

Owner Alex Meruelo, who bought the resort last April, revealed the new name — written in all capital letters — amid fireworks and a light-flashing drone show that projected jackpot-winning slot reels (triple cherries and triple sevens) in the sky above.

The finale spelled out “Sahara” in lights.

The name change comes amid an ongoing renovation of the property with a price tag of more than $100 million. The property’s 1,615 guest rooms, casino, restaurants and bars have been upgraded. Improvements to the lobby and other areas will continue into 2020, a news release said.

The Sahara closed in 2011, became an SLS hotel (short for “style, luxury and service”) in 2014, hosted a W Las Vegas in one of its towers for two years, and now has come full circle with the new-old Sahara name.

In a statement before the event, Meruelo said the hotel played “an important role in the evolution of the destination,” and pledged to continue that tradition “for the love of Vegas.”

Rooms this weekend start at $206 a night, according to the website.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

More From the Los Angeles Times

At parks and other attractions, thousands of jobs are unfilled

Housesitting comes with responsibilities, but it can help stretch your vacation budget. Here’s how to find gigs.

A stretch of Salvadoran shoreline called Surf City is the location for the final qualifying rounds for surfing’s debut as an Olympic sport this summer.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

These trips will take you to priceless places, and our pro tips will help you dig deeper.

The state’s economy will reopen, but ‘the disease has not been extinguished,’ governor says.

In recent years, the boardwalk has become an open-air clinic for poor residents, people struggling with addiction and those in physical or mental distress.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

Mike Broomhead, a talk radio host in Phoenix, used to support a local audit of the 2020 election. Now he’s urging fellow Republicans to reconsider.


Sahara hotel returns to Las Vegas in splashy renaming ceremony. Bye bye, SLS

Like a Las Vegas magic trick, the legendary Sahara hotel-casino reappeared on the Strip during a splashy renaming of the SLS resort Thursday evening. The Moroccan-themed hotel that opened in 1952 and helped shape Vegas’ midcentury glamour, hosting A-listers such as Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, was back.

Owner Alex Meruelo, who bought the resort last April, revealed the new name — written in all capital letters — amid fireworks and a light-flashing drone show that projected jackpot-winning slot reels (triple cherries and triple sevens) in the sky above.

The finale spelled out “Sahara” in lights.

The name change comes amid an ongoing renovation of the property with a price tag of more than $100 million. The property’s 1,615 guest rooms, casino, restaurants and bars have been upgraded. Improvements to the lobby and other areas will continue into 2020, a news release said.

The Sahara closed in 2011, became an SLS hotel (short for “style, luxury and service”) in 2014, hosted a W Las Vegas in one of its towers for two years, and now has come full circle with the new-old Sahara name.

In a statement before the event, Meruelo said the hotel played “an important role in the evolution of the destination,” and pledged to continue that tradition “for the love of Vegas.”

Rooms this weekend start at $206 a night, according to the website.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

More From the Los Angeles Times

At parks and other attractions, thousands of jobs are unfilled

Housesitting comes with responsibilities, but it can help stretch your vacation budget. Here’s how to find gigs.

A stretch of Salvadoran shoreline called Surf City is the location for the final qualifying rounds for surfing’s debut as an Olympic sport this summer.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

These trips will take you to priceless places, and our pro tips will help you dig deeper.

The state’s economy will reopen, but ‘the disease has not been extinguished,’ governor says.

In recent years, the boardwalk has become an open-air clinic for poor residents, people struggling with addiction and those in physical or mental distress.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

Mike Broomhead, a talk radio host in Phoenix, used to support a local audit of the 2020 election. Now he’s urging fellow Republicans to reconsider.


Sahara hotel returns to Las Vegas in splashy renaming ceremony. Bye bye, SLS

Like a Las Vegas magic trick, the legendary Sahara hotel-casino reappeared on the Strip during a splashy renaming of the SLS resort Thursday evening. The Moroccan-themed hotel that opened in 1952 and helped shape Vegas’ midcentury glamour, hosting A-listers such as Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, was back.

Owner Alex Meruelo, who bought the resort last April, revealed the new name — written in all capital letters — amid fireworks and a light-flashing drone show that projected jackpot-winning slot reels (triple cherries and triple sevens) in the sky above.

The finale spelled out “Sahara” in lights.

The name change comes amid an ongoing renovation of the property with a price tag of more than $100 million. The property’s 1,615 guest rooms, casino, restaurants and bars have been upgraded. Improvements to the lobby and other areas will continue into 2020, a news release said.

The Sahara closed in 2011, became an SLS hotel (short for “style, luxury and service”) in 2014, hosted a W Las Vegas in one of its towers for two years, and now has come full circle with the new-old Sahara name.

In a statement before the event, Meruelo said the hotel played “an important role in the evolution of the destination,” and pledged to continue that tradition “for the love of Vegas.”

Rooms this weekend start at $206 a night, according to the website.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

More From the Los Angeles Times

At parks and other attractions, thousands of jobs are unfilled

Housesitting comes with responsibilities, but it can help stretch your vacation budget. Here’s how to find gigs.

A stretch of Salvadoran shoreline called Surf City is the location for the final qualifying rounds for surfing’s debut as an Olympic sport this summer.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

These trips will take you to priceless places, and our pro tips will help you dig deeper.

The state’s economy will reopen, but ‘the disease has not been extinguished,’ governor says.

In recent years, the boardwalk has become an open-air clinic for poor residents, people struggling with addiction and those in physical or mental distress.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

Mike Broomhead, a talk radio host in Phoenix, used to support a local audit of the 2020 election. Now he’s urging fellow Republicans to reconsider.


Sahara hotel returns to Las Vegas in splashy renaming ceremony. Bye bye, SLS

Like a Las Vegas magic trick, the legendary Sahara hotel-casino reappeared on the Strip during a splashy renaming of the SLS resort Thursday evening. The Moroccan-themed hotel that opened in 1952 and helped shape Vegas’ midcentury glamour, hosting A-listers such as Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, was back.

Owner Alex Meruelo, who bought the resort last April, revealed the new name — written in all capital letters — amid fireworks and a light-flashing drone show that projected jackpot-winning slot reels (triple cherries and triple sevens) in the sky above.

The finale spelled out “Sahara” in lights.

The name change comes amid an ongoing renovation of the property with a price tag of more than $100 million. The property’s 1,615 guest rooms, casino, restaurants and bars have been upgraded. Improvements to the lobby and other areas will continue into 2020, a news release said.

The Sahara closed in 2011, became an SLS hotel (short for “style, luxury and service”) in 2014, hosted a W Las Vegas in one of its towers for two years, and now has come full circle with the new-old Sahara name.

In a statement before the event, Meruelo said the hotel played “an important role in the evolution of the destination,” and pledged to continue that tradition “for the love of Vegas.”

Rooms this weekend start at $206 a night, according to the website.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

More From the Los Angeles Times

At parks and other attractions, thousands of jobs are unfilled

Housesitting comes with responsibilities, but it can help stretch your vacation budget. Here’s how to find gigs.

A stretch of Salvadoran shoreline called Surf City is the location for the final qualifying rounds for surfing’s debut as an Olympic sport this summer.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

These trips will take you to priceless places, and our pro tips will help you dig deeper.

The state’s economy will reopen, but ‘the disease has not been extinguished,’ governor says.

In recent years, the boardwalk has become an open-air clinic for poor residents, people struggling with addiction and those in physical or mental distress.

Buckskin Gulch began as a hike, became an ordeal and turned into an adventure.

Mike Broomhead, a talk radio host in Phoenix, used to support a local audit of the 2020 election. Now he’s urging fellow Republicans to reconsider.


Watch the video: Virgin Hotels Las Vegas to open for business January 15 (December 2021).