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What You Should Expect for 2016 Healthy Eating Trends

What You Should Expect for 2016 Healthy Eating Trends

In 2015, we found multiple ways to use chia seeds. Roughly one out of every five Americans incorporates gluten-free foods into their diet. While some of the country went gluten-free, oatmeal reached an all-time high in trendiness (you can even get it in a grab-and-go squeeze pack now). Between increased focus on raw foods and hyper-local eating, our predictions for 2015 were pretty spot on. Now, with the majority of 2016’s hopefully health-filled days ahead of us, it’s time to reveal the scuttlebutt on what healthy eating enthusiasts will be digging into and dining on this year.

Click here for the Top Clean Eating Trends for 2015.

If you place your fingers under the point where your jaw hits your neck, you’ll feel a pulse. While we’re hoping that that pulse stays vital in 2016, we’re hoping to see an increase in the consumption of a completely different (and much more edible) type of pulse. These increasingly-trendy pulses include beans, lentils, and peas, and their health benefits have made them popular sources of nutrition for centuries. Packed with protein and fiber, pulses are powerful antioxidants and help promote a healthy cardiovascular system — something that’s vital for keeping the other pulse pumping.

Last year’s promotion of locavorism and raw food consumption have left us in a state of increased awareness when it comes to our food’s source and form. In 2016, we’re expecting to see this shift in awareness continue. “Root to stalk” cooking may become, for lack of a better term, the next big thing. This practice argues that much that is thrown away in conventional food prep is edible and, further, that it should be eaten. The Wall Street Journal's Jane Black posed a brilliant question on this topic: “So is garbage the new kale?” We think it will be.

In addition to more peas, beans, and carrot stalks, we expect to see adaptogens (stress-reducing herbs like ashwagandha, ginger, and licorice root) to pop up more frequently as well as an anti-inflammatory turmeric takeover. Only time will tell, however, and it’s possible that some not-so-accurate predictions for 2015 (hello, sea vegetables) may finally become staples in our clean eating diets.

The accompanying slideshow is provided by special contributor Lauren Gordon.


These Were the Most Popular Healthy Food Trends of 2019

With 2020 approaching, it’s always a good idea to take a look back at the healthy food trends of 2019 to see what we should stick with in the new year. Below, we break down seven of the most popular trends of the past year, including why they should or shouldn't be a part of your life come 2020.

Plant-Based Eating

The idea of eating more plants on your plate has been coined “plant-based” or “plant forward.” As most Americans don’t eat the recommended daily amounts of fruits, vegetables and fiber, eating a plant-based diet certainly can help meet these goals. Sometimes the term “plant-based” is equated with veganism. However, there is no true definition of plant-based and if you'd like to eat more plants in any capacity — go for it!

Will this trend stick around? Absolutely! Upping plant-based foods like whole grains, legume, nuts, seeds, fruit and vegetables certainly has its benefits. They can be complimented with dairy, eggs and lean proteins.

Meat Alternatives

Piggybacking on the plant-based trend, several companies have released plant-based meat alternatives like the Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat. Chain restaurants have even developed burgers and other dishes using these meat alternatives. You can now also find tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form.

Will this trend stick around? This trend is going strong for now, but it's unclear how many of these products will stick around. Many of the plant-based meat alternatives are made from many ingredients. Plus, the Impossible Burger bleeds like a burger thanks to the genetically modified heme that it contains. It's unclear whether these are actually "healthier" alternatives to the real deal.

Nutrigenomics

Many health professionals have started looking into the interaction between genetics and how the bioactive compounds in foods influence an individual’s health. The study of this interaction has been coined “nutrigenomics”, which has become quite popular in 2019. The touted benefit of nutrigenomics is prescribing a precise diet for an individual. Researchers are also looking at how nutrigenomics can help obese individuals and those who want to lose weight. However, nutrigenomics is not without controversy. Some registered dietitians feel it is a too simplistic approach and doesn’t take a person’s lifestyle and environment into account.

Will this trend stick around? The science of nutrigenomics is in its infancy. Plan on seeing more research and discussions on the topic come 2020.

Oatly Strawberry Ice Cream

Dairy-Free Ice Cream

Although dairy-free milk has been around for years, 2019 brought about an influx of dairy-free ice creams. Companies like Oatly, SO Delicious, Breyers, Ben & Jerry’s, Daiya and Coolhaus have dairy-free ice creams available.

Will this trend stick around? This trend doesn’t seem to be going away anytime soon. Expect to see more dairy-free ice cream developments in 2020.

Pea Protein

Pea protein has been taking the plant-based protein world by storm. The protein is derived from yellow split peas, which are part of the pulse family along with beans, peas, chickpeas and lentils. There has been an increase in the amount of products containing pea protein including plant-based beverages, protein powders, protein bars, veggie burgers, plant-based yogurts and plant-based meats.

Will this trend stick around? Pea protein certainly offers a valuable plant-based option for protein. Expect to find it in more products soon.

105492851

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has had a bad reputation for many years. Many folks believed it causes symptoms including headache, generalized weakness, palpitations and numbness in his arms. However, the myth of MSG began with a letter to the editor in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1968 where the author said that the symptoms he had after eating Chinese food could have been from a number of foods he ate including sodium, alcohol from the cooking wine or MSG. The letter was enough to cause the public to go in a tailspin, blaming and banishing MSG. Newer research has found that MSG actually has two-thirds less sodium than table salt and is unlikely to cause any of the negative symptoms mentioned above. You can now find MSG on tables in popular chef’s restaurants throughout the country.

Will this trend stick around? Debunking the myth of MSG will still be around in the upcoming years. You may also start seeing MSG bottles on more restaurant tables and added to more packaged foods.


These Were the Most Popular Healthy Food Trends of 2019

With 2020 approaching, it’s always a good idea to take a look back at the healthy food trends of 2019 to see what we should stick with in the new year. Below, we break down seven of the most popular trends of the past year, including why they should or shouldn't be a part of your life come 2020.

Plant-Based Eating

The idea of eating more plants on your plate has been coined “plant-based” or “plant forward.” As most Americans don’t eat the recommended daily amounts of fruits, vegetables and fiber, eating a plant-based diet certainly can help meet these goals. Sometimes the term “plant-based” is equated with veganism. However, there is no true definition of plant-based and if you'd like to eat more plants in any capacity — go for it!

Will this trend stick around? Absolutely! Upping plant-based foods like whole grains, legume, nuts, seeds, fruit and vegetables certainly has its benefits. They can be complimented with dairy, eggs and lean proteins.

Meat Alternatives

Piggybacking on the plant-based trend, several companies have released plant-based meat alternatives like the Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat. Chain restaurants have even developed burgers and other dishes using these meat alternatives. You can now also find tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form.

Will this trend stick around? This trend is going strong for now, but it's unclear how many of these products will stick around. Many of the plant-based meat alternatives are made from many ingredients. Plus, the Impossible Burger bleeds like a burger thanks to the genetically modified heme that it contains. It's unclear whether these are actually "healthier" alternatives to the real deal.

Nutrigenomics

Many health professionals have started looking into the interaction between genetics and how the bioactive compounds in foods influence an individual’s health. The study of this interaction has been coined “nutrigenomics”, which has become quite popular in 2019. The touted benefit of nutrigenomics is prescribing a precise diet for an individual. Researchers are also looking at how nutrigenomics can help obese individuals and those who want to lose weight. However, nutrigenomics is not without controversy. Some registered dietitians feel it is a too simplistic approach and doesn’t take a person’s lifestyle and environment into account.

Will this trend stick around? The science of nutrigenomics is in its infancy. Plan on seeing more research and discussions on the topic come 2020.

Oatly Strawberry Ice Cream

Dairy-Free Ice Cream

Although dairy-free milk has been around for years, 2019 brought about an influx of dairy-free ice creams. Companies like Oatly, SO Delicious, Breyers, Ben & Jerry’s, Daiya and Coolhaus have dairy-free ice creams available.

Will this trend stick around? This trend doesn’t seem to be going away anytime soon. Expect to see more dairy-free ice cream developments in 2020.

Pea Protein

Pea protein has been taking the plant-based protein world by storm. The protein is derived from yellow split peas, which are part of the pulse family along with beans, peas, chickpeas and lentils. There has been an increase in the amount of products containing pea protein including plant-based beverages, protein powders, protein bars, veggie burgers, plant-based yogurts and plant-based meats.

Will this trend stick around? Pea protein certainly offers a valuable plant-based option for protein. Expect to find it in more products soon.

105492851

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has had a bad reputation for many years. Many folks believed it causes symptoms including headache, generalized weakness, palpitations and numbness in his arms. However, the myth of MSG began with a letter to the editor in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1968 where the author said that the symptoms he had after eating Chinese food could have been from a number of foods he ate including sodium, alcohol from the cooking wine or MSG. The letter was enough to cause the public to go in a tailspin, blaming and banishing MSG. Newer research has found that MSG actually has two-thirds less sodium than table salt and is unlikely to cause any of the negative symptoms mentioned above. You can now find MSG on tables in popular chef’s restaurants throughout the country.

Will this trend stick around? Debunking the myth of MSG will still be around in the upcoming years. You may also start seeing MSG bottles on more restaurant tables and added to more packaged foods.


These Were the Most Popular Healthy Food Trends of 2019

With 2020 approaching, it’s always a good idea to take a look back at the healthy food trends of 2019 to see what we should stick with in the new year. Below, we break down seven of the most popular trends of the past year, including why they should or shouldn't be a part of your life come 2020.

Plant-Based Eating

The idea of eating more plants on your plate has been coined “plant-based” or “plant forward.” As most Americans don’t eat the recommended daily amounts of fruits, vegetables and fiber, eating a plant-based diet certainly can help meet these goals. Sometimes the term “plant-based” is equated with veganism. However, there is no true definition of plant-based and if you'd like to eat more plants in any capacity — go for it!

Will this trend stick around? Absolutely! Upping plant-based foods like whole grains, legume, nuts, seeds, fruit and vegetables certainly has its benefits. They can be complimented with dairy, eggs and lean proteins.

Meat Alternatives

Piggybacking on the plant-based trend, several companies have released plant-based meat alternatives like the Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat. Chain restaurants have even developed burgers and other dishes using these meat alternatives. You can now also find tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form.

Will this trend stick around? This trend is going strong for now, but it's unclear how many of these products will stick around. Many of the plant-based meat alternatives are made from many ingredients. Plus, the Impossible Burger bleeds like a burger thanks to the genetically modified heme that it contains. It's unclear whether these are actually "healthier" alternatives to the real deal.

Nutrigenomics

Many health professionals have started looking into the interaction between genetics and how the bioactive compounds in foods influence an individual’s health. The study of this interaction has been coined “nutrigenomics”, which has become quite popular in 2019. The touted benefit of nutrigenomics is prescribing a precise diet for an individual. Researchers are also looking at how nutrigenomics can help obese individuals and those who want to lose weight. However, nutrigenomics is not without controversy. Some registered dietitians feel it is a too simplistic approach and doesn’t take a person’s lifestyle and environment into account.

Will this trend stick around? The science of nutrigenomics is in its infancy. Plan on seeing more research and discussions on the topic come 2020.

Oatly Strawberry Ice Cream

Dairy-Free Ice Cream

Although dairy-free milk has been around for years, 2019 brought about an influx of dairy-free ice creams. Companies like Oatly, SO Delicious, Breyers, Ben & Jerry’s, Daiya and Coolhaus have dairy-free ice creams available.

Will this trend stick around? This trend doesn’t seem to be going away anytime soon. Expect to see more dairy-free ice cream developments in 2020.

Pea Protein

Pea protein has been taking the plant-based protein world by storm. The protein is derived from yellow split peas, which are part of the pulse family along with beans, peas, chickpeas and lentils. There has been an increase in the amount of products containing pea protein including plant-based beverages, protein powders, protein bars, veggie burgers, plant-based yogurts and plant-based meats.

Will this trend stick around? Pea protein certainly offers a valuable plant-based option for protein. Expect to find it in more products soon.

105492851

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has had a bad reputation for many years. Many folks believed it causes symptoms including headache, generalized weakness, palpitations and numbness in his arms. However, the myth of MSG began with a letter to the editor in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1968 where the author said that the symptoms he had after eating Chinese food could have been from a number of foods he ate including sodium, alcohol from the cooking wine or MSG. The letter was enough to cause the public to go in a tailspin, blaming and banishing MSG. Newer research has found that MSG actually has two-thirds less sodium than table salt and is unlikely to cause any of the negative symptoms mentioned above. You can now find MSG on tables in popular chef’s restaurants throughout the country.

Will this trend stick around? Debunking the myth of MSG will still be around in the upcoming years. You may also start seeing MSG bottles on more restaurant tables and added to more packaged foods.


These Were the Most Popular Healthy Food Trends of 2019

With 2020 approaching, it’s always a good idea to take a look back at the healthy food trends of 2019 to see what we should stick with in the new year. Below, we break down seven of the most popular trends of the past year, including why they should or shouldn't be a part of your life come 2020.

Plant-Based Eating

The idea of eating more plants on your plate has been coined “plant-based” or “plant forward.” As most Americans don’t eat the recommended daily amounts of fruits, vegetables and fiber, eating a plant-based diet certainly can help meet these goals. Sometimes the term “plant-based” is equated with veganism. However, there is no true definition of plant-based and if you'd like to eat more plants in any capacity — go for it!

Will this trend stick around? Absolutely! Upping plant-based foods like whole grains, legume, nuts, seeds, fruit and vegetables certainly has its benefits. They can be complimented with dairy, eggs and lean proteins.

Meat Alternatives

Piggybacking on the plant-based trend, several companies have released plant-based meat alternatives like the Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat. Chain restaurants have even developed burgers and other dishes using these meat alternatives. You can now also find tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form.

Will this trend stick around? This trend is going strong for now, but it's unclear how many of these products will stick around. Many of the plant-based meat alternatives are made from many ingredients. Plus, the Impossible Burger bleeds like a burger thanks to the genetically modified heme that it contains. It's unclear whether these are actually "healthier" alternatives to the real deal.

Nutrigenomics

Many health professionals have started looking into the interaction between genetics and how the bioactive compounds in foods influence an individual’s health. The study of this interaction has been coined “nutrigenomics”, which has become quite popular in 2019. The touted benefit of nutrigenomics is prescribing a precise diet for an individual. Researchers are also looking at how nutrigenomics can help obese individuals and those who want to lose weight. However, nutrigenomics is not without controversy. Some registered dietitians feel it is a too simplistic approach and doesn’t take a person’s lifestyle and environment into account.

Will this trend stick around? The science of nutrigenomics is in its infancy. Plan on seeing more research and discussions on the topic come 2020.

Oatly Strawberry Ice Cream

Dairy-Free Ice Cream

Although dairy-free milk has been around for years, 2019 brought about an influx of dairy-free ice creams. Companies like Oatly, SO Delicious, Breyers, Ben & Jerry’s, Daiya and Coolhaus have dairy-free ice creams available.

Will this trend stick around? This trend doesn’t seem to be going away anytime soon. Expect to see more dairy-free ice cream developments in 2020.

Pea Protein

Pea protein has been taking the plant-based protein world by storm. The protein is derived from yellow split peas, which are part of the pulse family along with beans, peas, chickpeas and lentils. There has been an increase in the amount of products containing pea protein including plant-based beverages, protein powders, protein bars, veggie burgers, plant-based yogurts and plant-based meats.

Will this trend stick around? Pea protein certainly offers a valuable plant-based option for protein. Expect to find it in more products soon.

105492851

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has had a bad reputation for many years. Many folks believed it causes symptoms including headache, generalized weakness, palpitations and numbness in his arms. However, the myth of MSG began with a letter to the editor in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1968 where the author said that the symptoms he had after eating Chinese food could have been from a number of foods he ate including sodium, alcohol from the cooking wine or MSG. The letter was enough to cause the public to go in a tailspin, blaming and banishing MSG. Newer research has found that MSG actually has two-thirds less sodium than table salt and is unlikely to cause any of the negative symptoms mentioned above. You can now find MSG on tables in popular chef’s restaurants throughout the country.

Will this trend stick around? Debunking the myth of MSG will still be around in the upcoming years. You may also start seeing MSG bottles on more restaurant tables and added to more packaged foods.


These Were the Most Popular Healthy Food Trends of 2019

With 2020 approaching, it’s always a good idea to take a look back at the healthy food trends of 2019 to see what we should stick with in the new year. Below, we break down seven of the most popular trends of the past year, including why they should or shouldn't be a part of your life come 2020.

Plant-Based Eating

The idea of eating more plants on your plate has been coined “plant-based” or “plant forward.” As most Americans don’t eat the recommended daily amounts of fruits, vegetables and fiber, eating a plant-based diet certainly can help meet these goals. Sometimes the term “plant-based” is equated with veganism. However, there is no true definition of plant-based and if you'd like to eat more plants in any capacity — go for it!

Will this trend stick around? Absolutely! Upping plant-based foods like whole grains, legume, nuts, seeds, fruit and vegetables certainly has its benefits. They can be complimented with dairy, eggs and lean proteins.

Meat Alternatives

Piggybacking on the plant-based trend, several companies have released plant-based meat alternatives like the Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat. Chain restaurants have even developed burgers and other dishes using these meat alternatives. You can now also find tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form.

Will this trend stick around? This trend is going strong for now, but it's unclear how many of these products will stick around. Many of the plant-based meat alternatives are made from many ingredients. Plus, the Impossible Burger bleeds like a burger thanks to the genetically modified heme that it contains. It's unclear whether these are actually "healthier" alternatives to the real deal.

Nutrigenomics

Many health professionals have started looking into the interaction between genetics and how the bioactive compounds in foods influence an individual’s health. The study of this interaction has been coined “nutrigenomics”, which has become quite popular in 2019. The touted benefit of nutrigenomics is prescribing a precise diet for an individual. Researchers are also looking at how nutrigenomics can help obese individuals and those who want to lose weight. However, nutrigenomics is not without controversy. Some registered dietitians feel it is a too simplistic approach and doesn’t take a person’s lifestyle and environment into account.

Will this trend stick around? The science of nutrigenomics is in its infancy. Plan on seeing more research and discussions on the topic come 2020.

Oatly Strawberry Ice Cream

Dairy-Free Ice Cream

Although dairy-free milk has been around for years, 2019 brought about an influx of dairy-free ice creams. Companies like Oatly, SO Delicious, Breyers, Ben & Jerry’s, Daiya and Coolhaus have dairy-free ice creams available.

Will this trend stick around? This trend doesn’t seem to be going away anytime soon. Expect to see more dairy-free ice cream developments in 2020.

Pea Protein

Pea protein has been taking the plant-based protein world by storm. The protein is derived from yellow split peas, which are part of the pulse family along with beans, peas, chickpeas and lentils. There has been an increase in the amount of products containing pea protein including plant-based beverages, protein powders, protein bars, veggie burgers, plant-based yogurts and plant-based meats.

Will this trend stick around? Pea protein certainly offers a valuable plant-based option for protein. Expect to find it in more products soon.

105492851

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has had a bad reputation for many years. Many folks believed it causes symptoms including headache, generalized weakness, palpitations and numbness in his arms. However, the myth of MSG began with a letter to the editor in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1968 where the author said that the symptoms he had after eating Chinese food could have been from a number of foods he ate including sodium, alcohol from the cooking wine or MSG. The letter was enough to cause the public to go in a tailspin, blaming and banishing MSG. Newer research has found that MSG actually has two-thirds less sodium than table salt and is unlikely to cause any of the negative symptoms mentioned above. You can now find MSG on tables in popular chef’s restaurants throughout the country.

Will this trend stick around? Debunking the myth of MSG will still be around in the upcoming years. You may also start seeing MSG bottles on more restaurant tables and added to more packaged foods.


These Were the Most Popular Healthy Food Trends of 2019

With 2020 approaching, it’s always a good idea to take a look back at the healthy food trends of 2019 to see what we should stick with in the new year. Below, we break down seven of the most popular trends of the past year, including why they should or shouldn't be a part of your life come 2020.

Plant-Based Eating

The idea of eating more plants on your plate has been coined “plant-based” or “plant forward.” As most Americans don’t eat the recommended daily amounts of fruits, vegetables and fiber, eating a plant-based diet certainly can help meet these goals. Sometimes the term “plant-based” is equated with veganism. However, there is no true definition of plant-based and if you'd like to eat more plants in any capacity — go for it!

Will this trend stick around? Absolutely! Upping plant-based foods like whole grains, legume, nuts, seeds, fruit and vegetables certainly has its benefits. They can be complimented with dairy, eggs and lean proteins.

Meat Alternatives

Piggybacking on the plant-based trend, several companies have released plant-based meat alternatives like the Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat. Chain restaurants have even developed burgers and other dishes using these meat alternatives. You can now also find tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form.

Will this trend stick around? This trend is going strong for now, but it's unclear how many of these products will stick around. Many of the plant-based meat alternatives are made from many ingredients. Plus, the Impossible Burger bleeds like a burger thanks to the genetically modified heme that it contains. It's unclear whether these are actually "healthier" alternatives to the real deal.

Nutrigenomics

Many health professionals have started looking into the interaction between genetics and how the bioactive compounds in foods influence an individual’s health. The study of this interaction has been coined “nutrigenomics”, which has become quite popular in 2019. The touted benefit of nutrigenomics is prescribing a precise diet for an individual. Researchers are also looking at how nutrigenomics can help obese individuals and those who want to lose weight. However, nutrigenomics is not without controversy. Some registered dietitians feel it is a too simplistic approach and doesn’t take a person’s lifestyle and environment into account.

Will this trend stick around? The science of nutrigenomics is in its infancy. Plan on seeing more research and discussions on the topic come 2020.

Oatly Strawberry Ice Cream

Dairy-Free Ice Cream

Although dairy-free milk has been around for years, 2019 brought about an influx of dairy-free ice creams. Companies like Oatly, SO Delicious, Breyers, Ben & Jerry’s, Daiya and Coolhaus have dairy-free ice creams available.

Will this trend stick around? This trend doesn’t seem to be going away anytime soon. Expect to see more dairy-free ice cream developments in 2020.

Pea Protein

Pea protein has been taking the plant-based protein world by storm. The protein is derived from yellow split peas, which are part of the pulse family along with beans, peas, chickpeas and lentils. There has been an increase in the amount of products containing pea protein including plant-based beverages, protein powders, protein bars, veggie burgers, plant-based yogurts and plant-based meats.

Will this trend stick around? Pea protein certainly offers a valuable plant-based option for protein. Expect to find it in more products soon.

105492851

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has had a bad reputation for many years. Many folks believed it causes symptoms including headache, generalized weakness, palpitations and numbness in his arms. However, the myth of MSG began with a letter to the editor in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1968 where the author said that the symptoms he had after eating Chinese food could have been from a number of foods he ate including sodium, alcohol from the cooking wine or MSG. The letter was enough to cause the public to go in a tailspin, blaming and banishing MSG. Newer research has found that MSG actually has two-thirds less sodium than table salt and is unlikely to cause any of the negative symptoms mentioned above. You can now find MSG on tables in popular chef’s restaurants throughout the country.

Will this trend stick around? Debunking the myth of MSG will still be around in the upcoming years. You may also start seeing MSG bottles on more restaurant tables and added to more packaged foods.


These Were the Most Popular Healthy Food Trends of 2019

With 2020 approaching, it’s always a good idea to take a look back at the healthy food trends of 2019 to see what we should stick with in the new year. Below, we break down seven of the most popular trends of the past year, including why they should or shouldn't be a part of your life come 2020.

Plant-Based Eating

The idea of eating more plants on your plate has been coined “plant-based” or “plant forward.” As most Americans don’t eat the recommended daily amounts of fruits, vegetables and fiber, eating a plant-based diet certainly can help meet these goals. Sometimes the term “plant-based” is equated with veganism. However, there is no true definition of plant-based and if you'd like to eat more plants in any capacity — go for it!

Will this trend stick around? Absolutely! Upping plant-based foods like whole grains, legume, nuts, seeds, fruit and vegetables certainly has its benefits. They can be complimented with dairy, eggs and lean proteins.

Meat Alternatives

Piggybacking on the plant-based trend, several companies have released plant-based meat alternatives like the Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat. Chain restaurants have even developed burgers and other dishes using these meat alternatives. You can now also find tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form.

Will this trend stick around? This trend is going strong for now, but it's unclear how many of these products will stick around. Many of the plant-based meat alternatives are made from many ingredients. Plus, the Impossible Burger bleeds like a burger thanks to the genetically modified heme that it contains. It's unclear whether these are actually "healthier" alternatives to the real deal.

Nutrigenomics

Many health professionals have started looking into the interaction between genetics and how the bioactive compounds in foods influence an individual’s health. The study of this interaction has been coined “nutrigenomics”, which has become quite popular in 2019. The touted benefit of nutrigenomics is prescribing a precise diet for an individual. Researchers are also looking at how nutrigenomics can help obese individuals and those who want to lose weight. However, nutrigenomics is not without controversy. Some registered dietitians feel it is a too simplistic approach and doesn’t take a person’s lifestyle and environment into account.

Will this trend stick around? The science of nutrigenomics is in its infancy. Plan on seeing more research and discussions on the topic come 2020.

Oatly Strawberry Ice Cream

Dairy-Free Ice Cream

Although dairy-free milk has been around for years, 2019 brought about an influx of dairy-free ice creams. Companies like Oatly, SO Delicious, Breyers, Ben & Jerry’s, Daiya and Coolhaus have dairy-free ice creams available.

Will this trend stick around? This trend doesn’t seem to be going away anytime soon. Expect to see more dairy-free ice cream developments in 2020.

Pea Protein

Pea protein has been taking the plant-based protein world by storm. The protein is derived from yellow split peas, which are part of the pulse family along with beans, peas, chickpeas and lentils. There has been an increase in the amount of products containing pea protein including plant-based beverages, protein powders, protein bars, veggie burgers, plant-based yogurts and plant-based meats.

Will this trend stick around? Pea protein certainly offers a valuable plant-based option for protein. Expect to find it in more products soon.

105492851

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has had a bad reputation for many years. Many folks believed it causes symptoms including headache, generalized weakness, palpitations and numbness in his arms. However, the myth of MSG began with a letter to the editor in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1968 where the author said that the symptoms he had after eating Chinese food could have been from a number of foods he ate including sodium, alcohol from the cooking wine or MSG. The letter was enough to cause the public to go in a tailspin, blaming and banishing MSG. Newer research has found that MSG actually has two-thirds less sodium than table salt and is unlikely to cause any of the negative symptoms mentioned above. You can now find MSG on tables in popular chef’s restaurants throughout the country.

Will this trend stick around? Debunking the myth of MSG will still be around in the upcoming years. You may also start seeing MSG bottles on more restaurant tables and added to more packaged foods.


These Were the Most Popular Healthy Food Trends of 2019

With 2020 approaching, it’s always a good idea to take a look back at the healthy food trends of 2019 to see what we should stick with in the new year. Below, we break down seven of the most popular trends of the past year, including why they should or shouldn't be a part of your life come 2020.

Plant-Based Eating

The idea of eating more plants on your plate has been coined “plant-based” or “plant forward.” As most Americans don’t eat the recommended daily amounts of fruits, vegetables and fiber, eating a plant-based diet certainly can help meet these goals. Sometimes the term “plant-based” is equated with veganism. However, there is no true definition of plant-based and if you'd like to eat more plants in any capacity — go for it!

Will this trend stick around? Absolutely! Upping plant-based foods like whole grains, legume, nuts, seeds, fruit and vegetables certainly has its benefits. They can be complimented with dairy, eggs and lean proteins.

Meat Alternatives

Piggybacking on the plant-based trend, several companies have released plant-based meat alternatives like the Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat. Chain restaurants have even developed burgers and other dishes using these meat alternatives. You can now also find tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form.

Will this trend stick around? This trend is going strong for now, but it's unclear how many of these products will stick around. Many of the plant-based meat alternatives are made from many ingredients. Plus, the Impossible Burger bleeds like a burger thanks to the genetically modified heme that it contains. It's unclear whether these are actually "healthier" alternatives to the real deal.

Nutrigenomics

Many health professionals have started looking into the interaction between genetics and how the bioactive compounds in foods influence an individual’s health. The study of this interaction has been coined “nutrigenomics”, which has become quite popular in 2019. The touted benefit of nutrigenomics is prescribing a precise diet for an individual. Researchers are also looking at how nutrigenomics can help obese individuals and those who want to lose weight. However, nutrigenomics is not without controversy. Some registered dietitians feel it is a too simplistic approach and doesn’t take a person’s lifestyle and environment into account.

Will this trend stick around? The science of nutrigenomics is in its infancy. Plan on seeing more research and discussions on the topic come 2020.

Oatly Strawberry Ice Cream

Dairy-Free Ice Cream

Although dairy-free milk has been around for years, 2019 brought about an influx of dairy-free ice creams. Companies like Oatly, SO Delicious, Breyers, Ben & Jerry’s, Daiya and Coolhaus have dairy-free ice creams available.

Will this trend stick around? This trend doesn’t seem to be going away anytime soon. Expect to see more dairy-free ice cream developments in 2020.

Pea Protein

Pea protein has been taking the plant-based protein world by storm. The protein is derived from yellow split peas, which are part of the pulse family along with beans, peas, chickpeas and lentils. There has been an increase in the amount of products containing pea protein including plant-based beverages, protein powders, protein bars, veggie burgers, plant-based yogurts and plant-based meats.

Will this trend stick around? Pea protein certainly offers a valuable plant-based option for protein. Expect to find it in more products soon.

105492851

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has had a bad reputation for many years. Many folks believed it causes symptoms including headache, generalized weakness, palpitations and numbness in his arms. However, the myth of MSG began with a letter to the editor in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1968 where the author said that the symptoms he had after eating Chinese food could have been from a number of foods he ate including sodium, alcohol from the cooking wine or MSG. The letter was enough to cause the public to go in a tailspin, blaming and banishing MSG. Newer research has found that MSG actually has two-thirds less sodium than table salt and is unlikely to cause any of the negative symptoms mentioned above. You can now find MSG on tables in popular chef’s restaurants throughout the country.

Will this trend stick around? Debunking the myth of MSG will still be around in the upcoming years. You may also start seeing MSG bottles on more restaurant tables and added to more packaged foods.


These Were the Most Popular Healthy Food Trends of 2019

With 2020 approaching, it’s always a good idea to take a look back at the healthy food trends of 2019 to see what we should stick with in the new year. Below, we break down seven of the most popular trends of the past year, including why they should or shouldn't be a part of your life come 2020.

Plant-Based Eating

The idea of eating more plants on your plate has been coined “plant-based” or “plant forward.” As most Americans don’t eat the recommended daily amounts of fruits, vegetables and fiber, eating a plant-based diet certainly can help meet these goals. Sometimes the term “plant-based” is equated with veganism. However, there is no true definition of plant-based and if you'd like to eat more plants in any capacity — go for it!

Will this trend stick around? Absolutely! Upping plant-based foods like whole grains, legume, nuts, seeds, fruit and vegetables certainly has its benefits. They can be complimented with dairy, eggs and lean proteins.

Meat Alternatives

Piggybacking on the plant-based trend, several companies have released plant-based meat alternatives like the Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat. Chain restaurants have even developed burgers and other dishes using these meat alternatives. You can now also find tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form.

Will this trend stick around? This trend is going strong for now, but it's unclear how many of these products will stick around. Many of the plant-based meat alternatives are made from many ingredients. Plus, the Impossible Burger bleeds like a burger thanks to the genetically modified heme that it contains. It's unclear whether these are actually "healthier" alternatives to the real deal.

Nutrigenomics

Many health professionals have started looking into the interaction between genetics and how the bioactive compounds in foods influence an individual’s health. The study of this interaction has been coined “nutrigenomics”, which has become quite popular in 2019. The touted benefit of nutrigenomics is prescribing a precise diet for an individual. Researchers are also looking at how nutrigenomics can help obese individuals and those who want to lose weight. However, nutrigenomics is not without controversy. Some registered dietitians feel it is a too simplistic approach and doesn’t take a person’s lifestyle and environment into account.

Will this trend stick around? The science of nutrigenomics is in its infancy. Plan on seeing more research and discussions on the topic come 2020.

Oatly Strawberry Ice Cream

Dairy-Free Ice Cream

Although dairy-free milk has been around for years, 2019 brought about an influx of dairy-free ice creams. Companies like Oatly, SO Delicious, Breyers, Ben & Jerry’s, Daiya and Coolhaus have dairy-free ice creams available.

Will this trend stick around? This trend doesn’t seem to be going away anytime soon. Expect to see more dairy-free ice cream developments in 2020.

Pea Protein

Pea protein has been taking the plant-based protein world by storm. The protein is derived from yellow split peas, which are part of the pulse family along with beans, peas, chickpeas and lentils. There has been an increase in the amount of products containing pea protein including plant-based beverages, protein powders, protein bars, veggie burgers, plant-based yogurts and plant-based meats.

Will this trend stick around? Pea protein certainly offers a valuable plant-based option for protein. Expect to find it in more products soon.

105492851

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has had a bad reputation for many years. Many folks believed it causes symptoms including headache, generalized weakness, palpitations and numbness in his arms. However, the myth of MSG began with a letter to the editor in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1968 where the author said that the symptoms he had after eating Chinese food could have been from a number of foods he ate including sodium, alcohol from the cooking wine or MSG. The letter was enough to cause the public to go in a tailspin, blaming and banishing MSG. Newer research has found that MSG actually has two-thirds less sodium than table salt and is unlikely to cause any of the negative symptoms mentioned above. You can now find MSG on tables in popular chef’s restaurants throughout the country.

Will this trend stick around? Debunking the myth of MSG will still be around in the upcoming years. You may also start seeing MSG bottles on more restaurant tables and added to more packaged foods.


These Were the Most Popular Healthy Food Trends of 2019

With 2020 approaching, it’s always a good idea to take a look back at the healthy food trends of 2019 to see what we should stick with in the new year. Below, we break down seven of the most popular trends of the past year, including why they should or shouldn't be a part of your life come 2020.

Plant-Based Eating

The idea of eating more plants on your plate has been coined “plant-based” or “plant forward.” As most Americans don’t eat the recommended daily amounts of fruits, vegetables and fiber, eating a plant-based diet certainly can help meet these goals. Sometimes the term “plant-based” is equated with veganism. However, there is no true definition of plant-based and if you'd like to eat more plants in any capacity — go for it!

Will this trend stick around? Absolutely! Upping plant-based foods like whole grains, legume, nuts, seeds, fruit and vegetables certainly has its benefits. They can be complimented with dairy, eggs and lean proteins.

Meat Alternatives

Piggybacking on the plant-based trend, several companies have released plant-based meat alternatives like the Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat. Chain restaurants have even developed burgers and other dishes using these meat alternatives. You can now also find tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form.

Will this trend stick around? This trend is going strong for now, but it's unclear how many of these products will stick around. Many of the plant-based meat alternatives are made from many ingredients. Plus, the Impossible Burger bleeds like a burger thanks to the genetically modified heme that it contains. It's unclear whether these are actually "healthier" alternatives to the real deal.

Nutrigenomics

Many health professionals have started looking into the interaction between genetics and how the bioactive compounds in foods influence an individual’s health. The study of this interaction has been coined “nutrigenomics”, which has become quite popular in 2019. The touted benefit of nutrigenomics is prescribing a precise diet for an individual. Researchers are also looking at how nutrigenomics can help obese individuals and those who want to lose weight. However, nutrigenomics is not without controversy. Some registered dietitians feel it is a too simplistic approach and doesn’t take a person’s lifestyle and environment into account.

Will this trend stick around? The science of nutrigenomics is in its infancy. Plan on seeing more research and discussions on the topic come 2020.

Oatly Strawberry Ice Cream

Dairy-Free Ice Cream

Although dairy-free milk has been around for years, 2019 brought about an influx of dairy-free ice creams. Companies like Oatly, SO Delicious, Breyers, Ben & Jerry’s, Daiya and Coolhaus have dairy-free ice creams available.

Will this trend stick around? This trend doesn’t seem to be going away anytime soon. Expect to see more dairy-free ice cream developments in 2020.

Pea Protein

Pea protein has been taking the plant-based protein world by storm. The protein is derived from yellow split peas, which are part of the pulse family along with beans, peas, chickpeas and lentils. There has been an increase in the amount of products containing pea protein including plant-based beverages, protein powders, protein bars, veggie burgers, plant-based yogurts and plant-based meats.

Will this trend stick around? Pea protein certainly offers a valuable plant-based option for protein. Expect to find it in more products soon.

105492851

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has had a bad reputation for many years. Many folks believed it causes symptoms including headache, generalized weakness, palpitations and numbness in his arms. However, the myth of MSG began with a letter to the editor in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1968 where the author said that the symptoms he had after eating Chinese food could have been from a number of foods he ate including sodium, alcohol from the cooking wine or MSG. The letter was enough to cause the public to go in a tailspin, blaming and banishing MSG. Newer research has found that MSG actually has two-thirds less sodium than table salt and is unlikely to cause any of the negative symptoms mentioned above. You can now find MSG on tables in popular chef’s restaurants throughout the country.

Will this trend stick around? Debunking the myth of MSG will still be around in the upcoming years. You may also start seeing MSG bottles on more restaurant tables and added to more packaged foods.